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Domestic Violence

by | Aug 21, 2013 | Firm News |



Due to the stigma and severe penalties associated with domestic violence, it is not uncommon for individuals to falsely accuse another of domestic violence. The motivation could be as simple as revenge for cheating or an attempt to gain an advantage in a dissolution proceeding. It is important that you seek an attorney so that the whole truth may be disclosed. Far too often, the accused faces allegations that do not resemble reality. We will aggressively investigate the facts particular to your case and represent you passionately.


Corporal Injury on Spouse/ Cohabitant

California Penal Code § 273.5. (a) Any person who willfully inflicts upon a person who is his or her spouse, former spouse, cohabitant, former cohabitant, or the mother or father of his or her child, corporal injury resulting in a traumatic condition is guilty of a felony, and upon conviction thereof shall be punished by imprisonment in the state prison for two, three, or four years, or in a county jail for not more than one year, or by a fine of up to six thousand dollars ($6,000) or by both that fine and imprisonment.

Domestic Battery

California Penal Code § 243 (e) (1). When a battery is committed against a spouse, a person with whom the defendant is cohabiting, a person who is the parent of the defendant’s child, former spouse, fiancé, or fiancée, or a person with whom the defendant currently has, or has previously had, a dating or engagement relationship, the battery is punishable by a fine not exceeding two thousand dollars ($2,000), or by imprisonment in a county jail for a period of not more than one year, or by both that fine and imprisonment. If probation is granted, or the execution or imposition of the sentence is suspended, it shall be a condition thereof that the defendant participate in, for no less than one year, and successfully complete, a batterer’s treatment program, as described in Section 1203.097, or if none is available, another appropriate counseling program designated by the court. However, this provision shall not be construed as requiring a city, a county, or a city and county to provide a new program or higher level of service as contemplated by Section 6 of Article XIII B of the California Constitution.

Corporal Injury on a Child

California Penal Code § 273d. Any person who willfully inflicts upon a child any cruel or inhuman corporal punishment or an injury resulting in a traumatic condition is guilty of a felony and shall be punished by imprisonment pursuant to subdivision (h) of Section 1170 for two, four, or six years, or in a county jail for not more than one year, by a fine of up to six thousand dollars ($6,000), or by both that imprisonment and fine.

The above cited statutes are all domestic violence crimes, in which the victims are specially classified due to their vulnerability. Domestic violence is a serious allegation and comes with harsh punishments for those accused and convicted. The prosecution also has substantial discretion in pursuing a domestic violence charge, even if the victim desires to drop it.

A slight injury that causes a bruise or swelling is sufficient to be charged under the corporal injury statute. Under the battery statute, there does not need to be a visible injury.